Read e-book online Actualization: Linguistic Change in Progress. Papers from a PDF

By Henning Andersen (Ed.)

ISBN-10: 9027237263

ISBN-13: 9789027237262

This choice of papers consolidates the statement that linguistic swap quite often is actualized step-by-step: any structural innovation being brought, accredited, and generalized, over the years, in a single grammatical atmosphere after one other, in a development that may be understood by means of connection with the markedness values and the score of the conditioning positive aspects. The creation to the amount and a bankruptcy by means of Henning Andersen make clear the theoretical bases for this statement, that's exemplified and mentioned in separate chapters through Kristin Bakken, Alexander Bergs and Dieter Stein, Vit Bubenik, Ulrich Busse, Marianne Mithun, Lene Schøsler, and John Charles Smith within the mild of knowledge from the histories of Norwegian, English, Hindi, Northern Iroquoian, and Romance. a last bankruptcy by means of Michael Shapiro provides a philosophical point of view. The papers have been first awarded in a workshop on “Actualization styles in Linguistic swap” on the XIV foreign convention on ancient Linguistics, Vancouver, B.C. in 1999.

Show description

Read or Download Actualization: Linguistic Change in Progress. Papers from a Workshop Held at the 14th International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Vancouver, B.C., 14 August 1999 PDF

Best linguistics books

Language Production, Cognition, and the Lexicon (Text, - download pdf or read online

The ebook collects contributions from well-established researchers on the interface among language and cognition. It offers an summary of the newest insights into this interdisciplinary box from the views of common language processing, laptop technological know-how, psycholinguistics and cognitive technological know-how.

by Laila Dybkjaer (Editor), Holmer Hemsen (Editor), Wolfgang's Evaluation of Text and Speech Systems (Text, Speech and PDF

In its 9 chapters, this booklet offers an summary of the state of the art and top perform in numerous sub-fields of review of textual content and speech structures and parts. The assessment elements lined comprise speech and speaker reputation, speech synthesis, lively speaking brokers, part-of-speech tagging, parsing, and normal language software program like laptop translation, details retrieval, query answering, spoken discussion platforms, information assets, and annotation schemes.

Extra info for Actualization: Linguistic Change in Progress. Papers from a Workshop Held at the 14th International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Vancouver, B.C., 14 August 1999

Example text

1. Markedness in synchrony Much skepticism has been expressed in this century about the utility of the notion of markedness. It is my impression that this skepticism has been characteristic, first of all, of linguists who by virtue of their personal cognitive style or academic training MARKEDNESS AND THE THEORY OF CHANGE 25 (or both) are skeptical of anything that cannot be directly observed and tend to adopt what you might call a nominalist attitude to language and language description. To anyone who sees linguistic description as essentially a way for the linguist to organize his data—rather than as a hypothesis about the competence of the speakers of the language—markedness can easily seem readily dispensable.

I-ii). In reality, however, many relations that are in principle contradictory are practically contrary. For example, strictly speaking every person is either married or unmarried (normatively, tertium non datur). But real life presents us with intermediate states and borderline cases—the union that has not been consecrated, the marriage that has not been consummated (or, in some cultures, which has produced no issue), the spouse that has been widowed or abandoned (and may or may not be at liberty to marry again)—which persuade us to recognize a looser, essentially contrary understanding of the distinction "married" vs.

I-ii). In reality, however, many relations that are in principle contradictory are practically contrary. For example, strictly speaking every person is either married or unmarried (normatively, tertium non datur). But real life presents us with intermediate states and borderline cases—the union that has not been consecrated, the marriage that has not been consummated (or, in some cultures, which has produced no issue), the spouse that has been widowed or abandoned (and may or may not be at liberty to marry again)—which persuade us to recognize a looser, essentially contrary understanding of the distinction "married" vs.

Download PDF sample

Actualization: Linguistic Change in Progress. Papers from a Workshop Held at the 14th International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Vancouver, B.C., 14 August 1999 by Henning Andersen (Ed.)


by Thomas
4.0

Rated 4.85 of 5 – based on 37 votes